About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
into norfolk i think we'd all be in big trouble. >> brown: we assess the latest diplomatic moves to end syria's war, as secretary of state hillary clinton meets with russia's foreign minister. >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a program that aims to put students at low-achieving schools on a path to high school graduation. >> we're here to make things better. we're here to tutor kids. we're here to make sure that they stay on track. we are here to make sure that they graduate. we want to prepare tfo b : >>rown's >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. th and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: wit
with the u.n. envoy on syria and hillary clinton said events on the ground in syria are accelerating. she also joined the u.s. defense secretary in expressing concern that damascus is considering using chemical weapons against the rebels. >> i think there is no question that we remain very concerned, very concerned. as the opposition advances, in particular on damascus, the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> secretary panetta went on to say that the white house made it clear there will be consequences should the assad regime make the mistake of using those weapons on its own people. for more on the perspective from damascus, i spoke a short time ago to the bbc's jeremy bolon -- jeremy bowen. >> the issue has been pretty firm on the use of chemical weapons. any news from damascus? >> i think the regime here can feel the pressure. it has been under huge pressure in the last couple of weeks, increasing pressure. of the most pressure has faced from the west, certainly, in the almost two years this has been going on. i spoke before panetta made his remarks to the i
qaeda would have come back. you cannot prove that. >> all right, syria. how did the united states, how did the government, how did the administration handled syria? appropriately? and appropriately? enough? not enough? >> the good thing about the afghanistan and iraq forces that they are keeping us out of syria. >> syria could become a disaster. this is a country with a huge stockpile of chemical weapons, which are pretty active. we have allowed the saudis and qataris to arm the rebels, and those are the people who have armed the islamists, so the islamists now have the upper hand among the rebels. the west -- the british and french and we and the turks -- did not do anything comparable with the non-islamic opposition. we are looking at a possible country that would divide into three or four like yugoslavia, or could become jihadist, and syria is a serious country. it is not libya or afghanistan, and it think we will regret having no influence on the outcome. >> monolithic opposition, and the fact is there are opponents of that regime that we would not want to be associated with, eithe
known venues for the dawn of the new year. >> no happy new year in syria. the situation is as great as ever. the bodies of 30 people found with signs of torture in a suburb of damascus. the international peace negotiator of syria urged to push for peace talks between the government and rebels. the country could become a failed state ruled by warlords. in iraq, a wave of attacks killed nearly 23 people and injured more than 80 as a car bomb in a central baghdad neighborhood killed five and wounded 25. seven people were killed and houses. explosions took place in two other cities. but egyptian president has played down the slide in the value of the egyptian pound to a record low. those comments come as central banks launched a new system of the foreign-exchange options to local banks to try to control the value of the egyptian pound. the u.s. secretary of state, hillary clinton, is being treated for a blood clot in a vain between her brain and skull. doctors caring for say she should make a full recovery. earlier this month, the veteran politician suffered a concussion after fainting
. >> ifill: jeffrey brown examines new concerns over syria's chemical weapons capability and what, if anything, the u.s. can do about it. >> woodruff: from florida, hari sreenivasan has the story of endangered coral reefs. many of them dying because ocean temperatures are rising and the waters are more acidic. >> i remember seeing fields of elk horn coral that you couldn't see through it and you couldn't see beyond it and those same areas are dead you know 99% dead. ♪ >> ifill: and we close with a remembrance of jazz great dave brubeck who died today, one day shy of his 92nd birthday. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the nation's third- largest bank, citigroup, announced big job cuts as it continues to scale back in the wake of the financial crisis. the 11,000 employees to
more thing we want to go to. from iran to syria to libya to egypt to israeli, palestinian standoff over gaza, the obama administration's wishes have seldom been.raedpt >> we and the world haveed join in condemning the brutality of the assad regime. >> no one wants to determine what happened that night in benghazi more than the president and i do. >> and this administration has either been guilty of colossal incompetence or engaged in a coverup. >> a red line should be drawn right here. before iran completes the second stage of nuclear enrichment necessary to make a bottom. >> -- bomb. >> i will not keep american es in harm's way a single day required than is absolutely necessary for our national security. gwen: there's a lot of unfinished business. >> you can call the year of 2012 the year of unsolved problems. par of that didn't include, congress orks north korea. even china is bumping up against its neighbors and it's striking how little of this was discussed. but the economy always gets in the way of foreign policy. about the only piece to foreign policy that made its way to the camp
production crew have been freed from syria after being held captive for five days. they came under fire at a rebel checkpoint on monday. he said his captors talked openly about their loyalty to president assad. under hospital care after 4 -- after a stroke. there is discussion about whether to fly president talabani abroad for treatment appeared correct -- portrait and. -- for treatment. and pres. zuma and won comfortably, but many people question his role following allegations of corruption. jonathan edwards report. >> it could be the first world -- clean, tidy, prosperous. south africa's black middle class is now 3 million strong. this place is where the anc was founded a century ago. today, its leaders enjoy all the trappings of the area as they turn up for their conference. the anc remains remarkably relaxed, not even the discovery of a white extremist bomb plot has upset them. still, all is not well with the party. the president, jacob zuma, is being challenged by his deputy. president zuma himself has been strongly accused of corruption, raised here in his speech. >> we can stop c
to the story on syria last night. i mistakenly said that assad's father used chemical weapons against his own people, which he did not. we apologize for the error. a typhoon blew through the philippines. so far, 270 are dead. mudslides and floods washed away entire villages. rescue crews are still trying to get to some areas. the bbc now reports from manila. >> the human cost is great. current of water came gushing down the mountain, killing and injuring scores of people. people like this family. >> my father is in hospital. my mother and older brother were swept away by the flood water. that is the last time i saw them. my mother said to me, "i love you." >> carried to safety by his cousin, young julia's is facing the fact that most of his immediate family are dead. more than half of the reported casualties are from the same province. most of their crops have been wiped out. power and communications are down, homes and infrastructure destroyed. >> the government in manila is accused of doing too little, too late. -- too little, too late in past disasters. but this time, they are active. peop
the chemical weapons situation in syria and how imminent it is that they think the syrians might do something that would cause the united states and allies to have to do something. >> this gets to being able to walk and chew gum at the same time, being able to deal with the fiscal cliff but also potential chemical weapon crises in syria. if the whitehouse wasn't concerned the president wouldn't have gone out and delivered that speech earlier this week. >> rose: finally there's this thing that he has to continue with. he's got a new administration coming up in january. we're now in december. who is handling that transition, who is setting up the process of selecting a new secretary of state, a new secretary of defense, a new chief of staff, a new head of the cia? >> so peat rauss is a deputy chief of staff senior advisers, he's playing a central role on all of this. based on our reporting it look like what the president is going to do is first announce his security team and that could come as early as next week so he would be announcing at the same time secretary of state, defense secretary,
like syria, egypt, britain, france, you had to hold together this coalition which was an usual coalition, so to speak. the administration jim baker got u.n. sanction for this operation. and it was just, we had no headquarters in the region. right now the central command has a headquarters in qatar. there was fog like that. the arab states didn't really want the americans there and on a permanent basis. so we had, all of this had to be moved first to saudi arabia not region first from the defensive operation and then in an offensive operation. so just months and months for this to even, just to prepare for this. >> and he was in charge of that. but now he was as we lewded to in the piece also criticized for making some strategic mistakes. what were those? >> well, there were well two goals primary goal its one was to evict the iraqi forces from kuwait which was done in the 100 hour ground war after six weeks of bombing, remember that. but the other one was to destroy saddam hussein's offensive powers, primarily his republican guard force. because the thinking was if you didn't d
engel, has escaped from kidnappers in northern syria. he and his crew said they were dragged from their car on thursday by gunman supporting the assad regime. they escaped last night when their captors became engaged in a firefight with rebel forces. engel spoke in turkey today, flanked by two of his crew. we're very happy to be out. we're very happy to be back in turkey. we love being here. we love this country. we appreciate all the help. the last five days are days that we would rather forget. if you can understand, we just came out now. we haven't even left yet. we're very tired. >> holman: engel said he and his colleagues were kept bound and blindfolded, and subjected to mock executions. it was unclear whether all of the crew members escaped. five people working with a u.n. polio vaccination campaign in pakistan were shot to death today, possibly as part of a taliban campaign. a sixth worker was killed a day earlier. we have a report narrated by lindsey hilsum of independent television news. >> reporter: they were trying to prevent pakistani children from being crippled by po
a scene of scorched wreckage. in syria, the vice president now is warning that neither side will win the battle for control of the country. farouk al-sharaa is a longtime ally of president bashar al- assad's family. in an interview, he called for a national unity government with "broad powers." meanwhile, the violence raged on. rebel fighters claimed they captured an army infantry college near the northern city of aleppo. president obama and house speaker john boehner met today, amid signs of possible movement in the "fiscal cliff" negotiations. it was widely reported boehner gave ground on friday, and offered to raise tax rates for people earning more than $1 million a year. the president wants the threshold to be $250,000 a year. white house spokesman jay carney declined to address boehner's offer directly, but he did say this. >> the only plan that we have seen that achieves the size and the balance that's required for sustainable... for long-term deficit reduction and putting our economy on a sustainable fiscal path is the president's. >> holman: also today, senate majority leade
the word about jesus, he traveled to antioch, the capital of roman syria. >> antioch has one of the largest jewish communities outside of the jewish homeland-- it's been suggested that maybe something like 40,000 people in this jewish community. so we can... we must imagine a number of different jewish congregations and subsections of the city in and through which paul could have moved and still felt very much at home within the jewish community. >> wherever you have a sufficient number of jews, you would have a jewish community. wherever you have a jewish community, you would have a jewish synagogue. >> narrator: by the fourth century, the synagogue had become a formal place of worship. but in paul's day, especially in the diaspora, it was more of a community center. >> another remarkable feature of the synagogues in the diaspora is not only that they attracted large crowds of people, but among these crowds will have been gentiles. there is no barrier between jews and gentiles, and gentiles found the jewish synagogues-- and the jews themselves, apparently-- as open, friendly and why not go
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)